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Will Israel soon disappear?

Well, I never thought I'd have anything in common with Israelis... but according to this article and Israeli polls, we all seem to agree that little time is left before Israel is History.  What a blessing.

http://www.onenewsnow.com/Security/Default.aspx?id=236742

Will Israel soon disappear?

Chad Groening - OneNewsNow - 9/3/2008 10:45:00 AM
 

Leaders of a pro-Jewish movement within Israel's Likud Party believe that, thanks to a lack of leadership, Israel no longer has the aura of invincibility it once had. 

And things have gotten so bad in Israel that a majority of Israelis now believe the Jewish state will not even exist in the next two-to-three decades. Recently, Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert announced that he wants to release 200 more Islamic terrorists, including "those with blood on their hands" in order to appease Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas. 
 Rob Muchnick
Manhigut Yehudit, or the Jewish Leadership Movement of Likud, is strongly opposed to the continued appeasement of Israel's enemies. U.S. director Rob Muchnick says this sort of appeasement never happened in Israel's past.
 
"What Israel used to be known for is its daring and its wildly, spectacularly successful military and the strength of its military. Right now you have the majority of Israelis think[ing] the country won't exist in 20-to-30 years," Muchnick contends. "In what other country would they even take such a poll?"
 
The United States, perhaps? Muchnick says the attitude of many Israelis mirrors that of American liberals.
 
"I think, in America, they hate being part of 'big bad America', even though it's successful and not quite as free as the founding fathers envisioned it to be," he adds. "In Israel, these people – they're not embarrassed to be Israeli; they're embarrassed to be Jewish."
 
Muchnick believes his nation needs leaders who will lead the country in accord with Jewish values as embodied in the Jewish Leadership Movement.


...meaning from the Nile to the Euphrates I assume...

Comments

When ziostan's jewish population hits six million then the burnt offering will occur. They are being very precise this time as they want all the pieces of their eschaton in play.

We can assume that all the filthy vermin settlers that are uncounted are jewish.

..."the country’s population stands at 7,282,000, according to figures released by the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS). Some 5,499,000 of the population (75.5 percent) are Jews, 1,461,000 (20.1%) are Arabs and the remaining 322,000 (4.4%) are immigrants and their offspring who are not registered as Jews by the Interior Ministry.

According to the CBS statistics, since last Independence Day, the country’s population has risen by some 130,000, with most of this increase being attributed to natural growth. 156,400 new babies have been born and some 18,000 new immigrants have arrived.

Overall, 124,000 residents were added to the country’s population during the year. Eighty-eight percent of this figure were a result of natural growth (births minus deaths), and the remaining 12% from the immigration factor - the gap between the number of immigrants and the number of emigrants.

Aliya this year maintained the decreasing trend it has seen in recent years, falling below the 19,000 new immigrants in 2008."

but there is a significant difference between what we think and what the author of this piece thinks.

While we know that israel is destined to disappear, this guy asks the question not to underline this fact but to rally the israeli public behind a no-holds-barred genocidal campaign by the zionist state against its Arab neighbors.

The worst is yet to come...israel is about to implement its mad dog policy on a grand scale.

___________________________

"Money" has no value - people do.

___________________________

"Money" has no value - people do.

Took the words right out of my mouth.

Claymore,

Although I am your obedient student when it comes to HTML, I have to disagree with you a little here:

 First, I disagree on the fundamental question that Israelis are in control of their ‘numbers’ .  The way I see it,  is completely different.  Israelis are no longer at all in control regarding the number of Jews that enter and leave Israel.  Israelis are crawling on all fours in order to attract practically anyone into Israel proper and they don’t even mind converts.  Haven’t you noticed the activities of Jewish agencies in Georgia??  They will spend millions of US tax-payers money to get 200 hundred new immigrants.  What does this tell you?  This is called despair in my humble opinion.  Israelis have long lost the demographic battle and Zionist media is just doing an excellent job covering-up as usual for their people.

Where are the complete detailed official population statistics covering Israel/Palestine that used to come out regularly in the past?  They have faded away… for very good reasons.  Israel cannot afford allowing the world and especially the US tax-payer, to know what the true figures are. 

As for the statistics that you quote,  which are the geographic areas and which period are these statistics exactly covering?   We know that Israel has no borders and we know that when it is practical, Israel tends to include or exclude certain areas and people.. depending on the results it is seeking.

For example, it is important to note that 750,000.00 Israelis are living outside Israel but are included in their statistics.  Those 750 thousand have no intention according to Israeli officials,  of returning and this would mean that the figure you quote above in terms of the numbers of Israeli Jews has just dropped down to about 4.65 million.  If you wish to include all the Jews who are presently living in the occupied territories like the Golan Heights, your figure may go up a little, but it shall still be far lower than claimed by Israelis. 

There are also other factors to be considered:  while only 28% of the Israelis belong to the age 0-14 age bracket, 43.8 % of the Palestinians of the occupied territories do. 

While the Israeli population growth rate stands at 1.7%, that of Gaza stands at 3.6% and the West Bank at 1.9%.

As for fertility, while Israelis suffer from 2.77 children per women, Palestinians in Gaza produce 5.51 per woman and 4.06 in the West Bank.

 

Here are a few articles on population statistics and Israel’s demographic battle.   Sorry, but some are in French.. however the numbers are clear.  Others are old so I am not sure if the links are still active.  Hope it helps. 

Israelis are double faced.  They have a face for the West and for media... and then they have their real ugly face which we Arabs know from direct contact.   That same double-standard position applies also to how Israelis present their 'case' to the world.  I certainly agree with you that they are filthy bastards, but I think that you over-estimate them.  They are not in such 'control' as they make it appear. 


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2003/11/30/wmid30.xml&sSheet=/portal/2003/11/30/ixportal.html


Israel's plans to increase population are threatened as thousands flee violence


#336699; font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-theme-font: minor-bidi; mso-hansi-theme-font: minor-bidi; mso-bidi-theme-font: minor-bidi">By Inigo Gilmore in Jerusalem
#6699cc; font-family: "Arial","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-theme-font: minor-bidi; mso-hansi-theme-font: minor-bidi; mso-bidi-theme-font: minor-bidi">(Filed: 30/11/2003)


Alarm over emigration levels is growing among Israel's political leadership as the country's Jews - many of them recent immigrants - seek to escape the violence of the second intifada and recession.

The government wants to bring another million Jews to Israel by 2010. Yet figures released by the absorption ministry, responsible for helping new immigrants, have revealed that an estimated 760,000 Israelis are living abroad, up from 550,000 in 2000.

Only 23,000 people are expected to move to the Holy Land this year, the lowest figure since 1989. Tzipi Livni, the absorption minister, has described immigration as being in a "tailspin".

Christine Shalev, 36, who has a three-year-old daughter, took the decision to join the exodus when her best friend left for Canada two months ago.

"Israel is falling apart and enough is enough," said Ms Shalev, who works for a delivery service in Tel Aviv. "I feel trapped here but I hope in Canada I can find my freedom."

Some Israeli politicians are keen to boost the Jewish population to underpin their claim for more land. Yet interior ministry figures show that a quarter of the Americans who have come to Israel since 1989 have left.


On internet bulletin boards such as Janglo, aimed at English speakers in Jerusalem, many emigrants are selling off possessions before they leave the country. Demographers have warned that at the present rate, Jews will become a minority in Israel and the occupied territories within 20 years.

Michael Jankelowitz, a spokesman for the Jewish Agency, a government body responsible for bringing Jews to Israel, admits the scale of the challenge facing the government.

"There is big concern about what is happening," he said. "This is why finding a peaceful resolution is so important. At the moment people do not see a solution and this is the tragedy. The insecurity drives them crazy. It's like Russian roulette - you don't know when it is going to hit you."

Emigrants are reluctant to talk about their departure because Jewish immigration to Israel is the cornerstone of Zionism, the Jewish national movement. The late prime minister, Yitzhak Rabin, once described Jews who emigrated as the "lowliest of parasites".

Many families head for Canada. So far 6,000 Israelis have moved there this year, double last year's total. One couple, who did not wish to be identified, are leaving even though they only returned to Israel in June after three years in New York. Third-generation, university-educated Israelis, their grandparents were pioneers in building the state.

"I feel betrayed," said Hila, 37, whose husband, Dror, is also 37. "I don't want to raise my children in such a brutal society... My grandparents had such high ideals. What has become of Israel makes me so sad and bitter."


Israelis leave their land, forced out by a battered economy and years of violence

By Justin Huggler in Jerusalem
(2003)

Jean Max emigrated from Britain to Israel in 1970 as a committed Zionist. Her three children were born and grew up in Israel. But since they reached adulthood, all three have left for new lives in the United States.

And Ms Max, now divorced, is planning to follow them. Her American visa has arrived, she is going to Boston, where her daughter lives, to look for work. If she finds it, she is leaving Israel after 33 years.

Ms Max and her family are part of a growing phenomenon that has the Israeli political establishment worried. New figures from the Immigration and Absorption Ministry stunned the establishment. Those figures show 760,000 Israeli citizens now live abroad. The ministry says its figures are an informal estimate, based on research by Israeli embassies around the world.

Even so, for a country of just 6,600,000, it is a large number. But the big surprise was the growth in the number of Israelis living abroad: in 2000, it was 550,000. That increase has undoubtedly been fuelled by the suicide bombings and other attacks by Palestinian militants over the past three years, and by the severe recession into which the Israeli economy has been plunged.

full at link: http://news.independent.co.uk/world/middle_east/story.jsp?story=465406

 

http://www.subzeroblue.com/archives/000504.html

#999999 1pt solid; padding-right: 4pt; border-top: #999999 1pt solid; padding-left: 4pt; background: white; padding-bottom: 4pt; border-left: #999999 1pt solid; padding-top: 4pt; border-bottom: #999999 1pt solid; mso-element: para-border-div; mso-border-alt: solid #999999 .75pt">

#999999 .75pt">#2273c4; font-family: "Georgia","serif"">December 04, 2003#2273c4; font-family: "Georgia","serif"">

#6699cc 1pt dotted; mso-element: para-border-div; mso-border-bottom-alt: dotted #6699CC .75pt">

#6699CC .75pt; mso-padding-alt: 0in 0in 0in 0in">#003366; font-family: "Trebuchet MS","sans-serif"">Jewish exodus threatens Israel

#333333; line-height: 140%; font-family: "Verdana","sans-serif"">Alarm over emigration levels is growing among Israel's political leadership as the country's Jews seek to escape the violence in the country and the deepening recession.

#333333; line-height: 140%; font-family: "Verdana","sans-serif"">"Israel is falling apart and enough is enough"#333333; line-height: 140%; font-family: "Verdana","sans-serif""> said Ms. Shalev, who works for a delivery service in Tel Aviv.

#333333; line-height: 140%; font-family: "Verdana","sans-serif"">"I feel betrayed,"#333333; line-height: 140%; font-family: "Verdana","sans-serif""> said Hila, 37, whose husband, Dror, is also 37. "I don't want to raise my children in such a brutal society. ... My grandparents had such high ideals. What has become of Israel makes me so sad and bitter."

#333333; line-height: 140%; font-family: "Verdana","sans-serif"">"There is big concern about what is happening,"#333333; line-height: 140%; font-family: "Verdana","sans-serif""> says Michael Jankelowitz, a spokesman for the Jewish Agency, a government body responsible for bringing Jews to Israel. "This is why finding a peaceful resolution is so important. At the moment people do not see a solution and this is the tragedy. The insecurity drives them crazy. It's like Russian roulette ? you don't know when it is going to hit you."

#333333; line-height: 140%; font-family: "Verdana","sans-serif"">The government wants to bring another million Jews to Israel by 2010. #ff0066; line-height: 140%; font-family: "Verdana","sans-serif"">Yet figures released by the ministry responsible for helping new immigrants show that an estimated 760,000 Israelis are living abroad, up from 550,000 in 2000.#333333; line-height: 140%; font-family: "Verdana","sans-serif"">  Just 23,000 people are expected to move to Israel this year, the lowest figure since 1989.

#333333; line-height: 140%; font-family: "Verdana","sans-serif"">A quarter of the Americans who have come to Israel since 1989 have left. #333333; line-height: 140%; font-family: "Verdana","sans-serif"">
Many families are heading for Canada. So far 6,000 Israelis have moved there this year, double last year's total.

#333333; line-height: 140%; font-family: "Verdana","sans-serif"">Demographers have warned that at the present rate, Jews will become a minority in Israel and the occupied territories within 20 years.

#333333; font-family: "Verdana","sans-serif"; mso-fareast-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-bidi-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-ansi-language: EN-US; mso-fareast-language: EN-US; mso-bidi-language: AR-SA">Read the full article: Jewish exodus threatens state's composition


http://www.wrmea.com/archives/November_2005/0511023.html

 

Washington Report, November 2005, page 23

Special Report

Israel’s Disengagement: A Question of Numbers

By Sonja Pace

Ahmed’s shrieks rattle the windows in the hospital nursery. It hardly seems possible that the tiny lungs of this day-old Palestinian baby could make such a racket. But perhaps it is fitting, because the power in that tiny voice represents the greatest force that could shape the Israeli-Palestinian conflict in the years ahead—demographics. And there is no better illustration of that reality than Israel’s recent withdrawal from the Gaza Strip.

#ff0066; font-family: "Verdana","sans-serif"">A study published in Israel’s Haaretz newspaper in August stated that Jews are now outnumbered by non-Jews, mainly Palestinians, in Israel and the occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip. While the percentage points are not great, Professor Sergio della Pergola of Jerusalem’s Hebrew University says what counts is the trend, and that is undisputable. “The proportion of the Jewish sector of the population, which used to be a majority, is declining,” says della Pergola, whose research on demographics contributed to the Haaretz study.

Another recent study, by Arnon Soffer of Haifa University, warns that Jews will make up only 40 percent of the population within the next 10 years—unless Israel shrinks its borders.

Assessments such as these have many Israeli leaders worried, Ariel Sharon among them.

“Sharon talked about 8,000 Israelis living there [in Gaza] among 1.3 million Palestinians,” said former U.S. peace negotiator Dennis Ross. Speaking to journalists in Jerusalem just prior to the disengagement, Ross said demographics was one of the main underlying reasons for the Israeli withdrawal from Gaza.

Another reason, of course, was the ongoing conflict. Sharon acknowledged that the cost in money and lives of protecting the Gaza settlers was too high to sustain in a place where Jews had no realistic hope of ever outnumbering the Palestinians. And so, the man who once had been one of the staunchest proponents of settlements, ordered the dismantling of all 21 enclaves in Gaza and four small, isolated ones in the northern West Bank.

“True, they had a dream,” said Sharon of the settlers. “I did too, that we can hold on to all the territory, or most of the territory, but things have changed,” the prime minister acknowledged in a television address on the day thousands of Israeli soldiers and police went from settlement to settlement forcibly removing those illegal settlers who refused to leave voluntarily.

#ff0066; font-family: "Verdana","sans-serif"">What had “changed” were the numbers, which could not be ignored.

Israelis are worried about the viability of their state.

Numbers are crucial. Indeed, a central theme in political discussions and the media is the argument over who owns what, who was here first and who has the most right to be here. For both sides, the issue is one of survival.

Just over 50 years ago, in 1948, there were approximately 650,000 Jews and over 1.3 million Arabs living between the Jordan River and the Mediterranean. Israel’s Zionist founders had a dream—that all the Jews in the Diaspora would follow them to the new Jewish homeland and that they would keep coming. The weight of those numbers would secure the state, it was hoped, and make a strong argument for the need to acquire more Palestinian land.

It has not worked out that way, however. Jews—particularly those living prosperous lives in the West—did not flood into the new country. That fact, along with a significant drop in Jewish birthrates in the region, and a skyrocketing birthrate among Palestinians, has changed everything. According to U.N. figures, the average Palestinian woman in the West Bank and Gaza will have over five children in her lifetime, while an Israeli woman will have close to three children. Some experts argue that that figure would be even lower if it did not include the higher birth rates among Arabs living inside Israel.

Today, there are just over 5.2 million Jews and about 5.4 million Arabs (4 million Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza, 1.4 million Arab citizens of Israel) living in Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip. In addition, there are 185,000 non-Jewish foreign workers and another 290,000 non-Jewish immigrants, mainly from the former Soviet Union.

Pulling out from Gaza helped Israel by shifting the population balance, since taking the Gaza population of 1.3 million Arabs out of the equation boosts the proportion of Jews in the remaining areas under Israeli control, namely Israel and the West Bank. In this new equation, says della Pergola, “Jews are once again in the majority and can probably stay that way for the next 20 years.”

Sharon has made it clear that he believes there is no point in fighting the losing demographic battle on all fronts. He repeatedly has pointed out that giving up Gaza would allow Israel to better hold on to major portions of the West Bank, assuring Israelis that President George W. Bush has given his nod of approval to certain “realities on the ground”—interpreted as a green light to hold on to the major Jewish settlement blocs such as Ariel, Ma’ale Adumim and Gush Etzion.

Vice Prime Minister Ehud Olmert has strenuously denied reports that Israel only withdrew from Gaza so it could concentrate on expanding its claim to the West Bank. Within days of the Gaza pullout, however, Israeli Education Minister Limor Livnat said the withdrawal had opened a window of opportunity to expand settlements in precisely those places.

A few days after the last settler had been evacuated from Gaza, Israeli Interior Ministry spokesman Gilad Heiman said that the settler population in the West Bank had increased by nearly 13,000 in the past year, to a total of 246,000. He attributed the increase—which exceeded the number of settlers who had left Gaza—to new births in the settlements and an influx of new settlers.

Still, Israelis are worried about the viability of their state. When political leaders talk of maintaining a “Jewish and democratic state” they are talking about “reducing significantly the proportion of non-Jews within it,” according to della Pergola. And, predicted former U.S. diplomat Dennis Ross, that means future shifts by Israel to “secure its demographic viability.”

Such shifts could involve a variety of actions, della Pergola said, ranging from a partial withdrawal from the West Bank to a total withdrawal—or even what he terms a more radical solution of a negotiated land swap with the Palestinians. Whatever action is eventually taken, the Gaza withdrawal was but a temporary measure to ease the population pressure. The demographics dilemma has been postponed, but it will not go away.

Sonja Pace has been covering the Middle East since 1989, and is currently Jerusalem bureau chief for the Voice of America network. Any analysis or views expressed in this article are those of the author and not of VOA.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.thestar.com/News/World/article/464024

 

Demographers cook up a political hot potato in Holy Land

 

Group's figures say Arabs won't outnumber Jews, throwing Israel's peace-talk policy into question

Jul 21, 2008 04:30 AM

 

 

; font-family: "Verdana","sans-serif"">Oakland Ross

Middle East Bureau

JERUSALEM–Not all numbers give leading Israeli demographer Sergio Della Pergola a headache, but watch out for those that do.

The suggestion that there are 2.7 million Arabs living in Gaza and the West Bank and that Israelis make up 67 per cent of the population in the Holy Land make him downright testy.

Della Pergola is angered by these numbers, because they are being used to contradict his most important work – tracking the growth of Jewish and Arab populations within the Holy Land.

They are also being used to challenge several assumptions affecting this country's uncertain demographic future – including his belief that the Arab population in the Palestinian territories and Israel is growing faster than the Jewish one.

"Why are they doing this, and what is the source of their support?" he asked. "I have very, very serious reservations about the seriousness of their work."

"They" are an ad hoc collection of amateur researchers who refer to themselves as the American-Israeli Demographic Research Group, and they are aggressively challenging some widely accepted notions about this country's prospects on the population front, notions that have played an important role in shaping Israel's current bitter-pill strategy for long-term survival.

The first of these notions, based on research by Della Pergola and others, is that Jews are fated to become a minority in the Holy Land sometime during the next few decades, their ranks outstripped by far greater Arab population growth.

As a result – or so the conventional wisdom goes – Israel has no choice but to grit its teeth, trade land for peace, and accept the establishment of an independent Palestinian state on tracts of terra firma it would rather call its own.

It was this line of thinking that guided former prime minister Ariel Sharon when he unilaterally withdrew Israeli settlers and troops from the Gaza Strip three years ago.

A similar set of ideas underpins the present Israeli government's pursuit of peace talks with Palestinian leaders, aimed at producing some sort of two-state agreement by year's end.

Yoram Ettinger begs to disagree, and hauls out his PowerPoint demonstration to show numbers as he perceives them – numbers such as 2.7 million or 67 per cent.

A former Israeli diplomat, Ettinger is convinced Della Pergola and others have got this country's demographic prospects all wrong.

"There is a demographic problem for the Jewish state," he conceded, "but it is not lethal. Anyone who says Jews are about to become a minority are either mistaken or dangerously misleading."

For the past two years, Ettinger and his colleagues in the American-Israeli Demographic Research Group have been delivering this message to anyone who will listen.

Ettinger's central premise is simple. He insists the population of the West Bank has been substantially overstated since at least 1997.

There are now about 2.7 million Arabs dwelling in Gaza and the West Bank combined, he said – not 3.8 million, which was until recently the generally accepted figure.

Leaving the Gaza Strip out of the equation, Ettinger estimates that this country's nearly 6 million Jews represent 67 per cent of the population of a region that includes both Israel and the West Bank – a clear majority.

What's more, he describes this Jewish majority as a "long-term" phenomenon because, he says, traditionally high Arab birth rates are falling while Jewish birth rates are rising.

Armed with these conclusions, Ettinger is insisting the Israeli government should stop holding peace talks with Palestinians that involve any hint of territorial concessions."We can take our time and observe the situation for a number of years," he said. "Is it a global practice that you have to trade land for peace?"

Talk like this really gets under Della Pergola's skin, especially as it comes from an individual who is not – to put it bluntly – trained as a demographer.

As it happens, the Palestinian Authority recently scaled back its own population estimates, causing Della Pergola to do the same. "I maintain in round numbers that there are 3.5 million Palestinians in Gaza and the West Bank," he said.

The Israeli government, for its part, has yet to be swayed by the revisionist view promoted by Ettinger and his group, and instead forges ahead with peace talks aimed, however haltingly, at a two-state solution for the Holy Land.

"I don't think their work has had a great impact," remarked a senior Israeli government official. "A lot of people would think their findings fit a political need."

 

 

http://www.info-palestine.net/article.php3?id_article=4470

 

#444444; font-family: "Helvetica","sans-serif"; mso-ansi-language: FR" xml:lang="FR">La démographie palestinienne vaincra

vendredi 30 mai 2008 - 23h:41

Hossam Ramadan Ahmed - CPI

Un site propriétaire du service de renseignements américains (CIA) publie des données relatives aux recensements de populations (Israël, Cisjordanie, bande de Gaza).

Les données concernant "Israël", remises à jour la veille de la soixantième commémoration de la Nakba, la catastrophe de 1948, montrent que le nombre d’habitants d’"Israël", au début du mois de mai 2008, a atteint 7 112 359 personnes. 74,4% d’entre eux sont Juifs. 16% Musulmans. 1,2% Chrétiens. 1,6 % Druzes. 3,9% non déclarés.

Selon la même source, le nombre de Juifs serait de 5 433 842 personnes. Celui des Musulmans de l’intérieur d’"Israël" serait de 1 137 977 personnes. Celui des Chrétiens serait de 149 360 personnes. Et enfin celui, celui des Druzes serait de 113 798.

Dans le même contexte, un porte-parole du ministre israélien de l’Immigration estime le nombre d’Israéliens vivant à l’étranger à plus de 700 mille. Le ministre affirme qu’il offre beaucoup de propositions alléchantes pour qu’ils reviennent, en vain. Ainsi, si on fait le compte, le nombre de Juifs vivant dans la Palestine historique, dans les colonies de Cisjordanie et de l’Est de la ville d’Al-Quds (Jérusalem) et dans le mont du Golan, ne dépasse 4 733 842 personnes.

Quant aux Palestiniens, la source révèle que leur nombre en Cisjordanie est de 2 611 904. Dans la bande de Gaza, il est de 1 537 269 personnes. Et si on ajoute à ces nombres celui des Arabes - Musulmans, Chrétiens et Druzes - vivant à l’intérieur même d’"Israël" (de ordre de 1 401 135), le nombre de Palestiniens vivant sur la terre de la Palestine historique serait de 5 550 308 personnes. Ainsi, il est clair que la démographie sur la terre historique de la Palestine est au profit des Palestiniens, au détriment des Israéliens.

Les informations données par le même service de la CIA sont révélatrices de quelques problèmes démographiques [autre que le nombre] desquels souffre l’Entité sioniste, face à la situation démographique des habitants palestiniens de la terre historique de la Palestine. Ces problèmes peuvent être résumés en quelques points :

  • 1) Les tranches d’âge : Pendant que la tranche "0-14 ans" est de l’ordre d’environ 28% pour "Israël", il est de l’ordre d’environ 43.8% pour les territoires palestiniens. Pour la tranche "15-64 ans", elle est au nombre de 62,2% pour "Israël" et de 53,2% pour les Palestiniens. Quant aux personnes âgées, elles représentent 9,8% de la population d’"Israël", 2.5% seulement dans la bande de Gaza. 3,3% en Cisjordanie.

  • 2) La moyenne d’âge est clairement au profit des Palestiniens. Elle est de 28,9 ans en "Israël" contre 16,2 ans dans la bande de Gaza et 18,7 ans en Cisjordanie.

  • 3) La croissance annuelle de la population en "Israël" n’est que de 1.7%. Elle est de 3,6% dans la bande de Gaza et de 1.9% en Cisjordanie.

  • 4) La moyenne de naissance est de l’ordre de 20,02 pour mille, contre 38,38 dans la bande de Gaza et 30,35 en Cisjordanie, sachant que l’immigration est prise en compte dans le calcul de la croissance israélienne.

  • 5) Quant à la fécondité, elle est de l’ordre de 2,77 enfants seulement pour la femme israélienne, contre 5,51 pour la Palestinienne de la bande de Gaza et 4,06 pour celle de la Cisjordanie.

  • 6) La moyenne de la mortalité naturelle atteint les 5,41 pour mille en "Israël", contre 3,67 dans la bande de Gaza et 3,79 en Cisjordanie.

  • 7) Le niveau très élevé de la mortalité chez les nouveaux-nés dans les territoires palestiniens montre la grave dégradation du domaine de la santé, notamment dans la bande de Gaza assiégée depuis plus de deux ans. Il y a un peu plus de 4 enfants pour mille en "Israël", tandis qu’il dépasse les 18 enfants en Cisjordanie et les 21 dans la bande de Gaza.

En somme [et malgré le sombre dernier point], on peut facilement remarquer que la société palestinienne tend vers la jeunesse, contre la société israélienne qui se dégrade de plus en plus vers la vieillesse. On remarque également que l’immigration vers "Israël" baisse de plus en plus pour descendre à 1,7% des sources démographiques de l’Entité sioniste. Tout montre que les éléments d’autodestruction travaillent dans la société israélienne, inlassablement.

#990000; font-family: "Helvetica","sans-serif"; mso-ansi-language: FR" xml:lang="FR">

29 mai 2008 22h47 - Centre palestinien d’information - Article traduit et résumé par le CPI.


 

 

 

 

http://www.info-palestine.net/article.php3?id_article=4878

#444444; font-family: "Helvetica","sans-serif"; mso-ansi-language: FR" xml:lang="FR">La forte croissance de la population arabe met Israël en état d’alerte

samedi 9 août 2008 - 23h:27

Ana Carbajosa - El Païs

Les derniers chiffres ont mis en alarme toute la classe politique israélienne, ce qui a conduit Olmert et beaucoup d’autres à imaginer la création d’un Etat palestinien non pas comme un cadeau, mais comme condition de survie du projet sioniste.

(JPG)

Est-ce la raison pour laquelle les enfants Palestiniens sont régulièrement la cible de la politique criminelle de l’état israélien dans les Territoires Occupés ? - Photo : Reuters

Le premier ministre israélien, Ehud Olmert, s’en va. Dans quelques mois, il quittera le gouvernement, poussé vers la sortie par un des nombreux scandales de corruption qu’il accumule. Olmert s’en va, mais subiste la conviction qu’Israël ne sera pas un État viable le jour où les Palestiniens seront la majorité à l’intérieur de ses frontières comme dans les Territoires Occupés. Les hommes politiques en lice pour succéder à Olmert partagent la conviction que les projections démographiques, qui mettent en évidence la forte croissance de la population arabe et en même temps une baisse du nombre d’immigrants juifs, devront dicter les politiques à adopter dans cette région du monde, y compris la création d’un État palestinien.

Dans l’aspect démographique, comme presque partout, Israël est un cas unique. C’est un pays qui en 60 ans a multiplié sa population par cinq. On compte aujourd’hui un peu plus de sept millions d’habitants, contre les 650 000 qui y habitaient en 1948 lorsque l’État a été créé. La croissance rapide a été rendue possible par un taux de natalité élevé et par le débarquement de trois millions d’immigrants juifs.

Le changement qui se profile pourrait être tout aussi rapide, seulement cette fois-ci, à l’encontre des intérêts du projet sioniste, selon les mises en garde des démographes et selon ce que commencent à montrer les statistiques. D’une part, les juifs sont de moins en moins nombreux à faire leur aliya (le rassemblement des exilés dans leur patrie), ou alors ils émigrent d’Israël : 2007 a été la première année depuis 1989 où le nombre d’émigrants juifs n’a pas dépassé les 20 000 .

D’autre part, la population arabe, tant à l’intérieur des frontières de l’État d’Israël que dans la bande de Gaza et en Cisjordanie, a eu une croissance deux fois plus rapide que la population juive, selon les données traitées par Sergio Della Pergola, professeur à l’Université hébraïque de Jérusalem et qui est une autorité en la matière. Ces données mettent en évidence que les familles juives ont en moyenne 2,7 enfants, alors que la moyenne des Palestiniens tournent autour de 4. « Dans une vingtaine d’années, la population arabe vivant en Israël atteindra 30% [contre 20% aujourd’hui]. Une nation avec une minorité de 30% n’est plus une société unifiée, mais binationale », explique Della Pergola.

Mais les politiciens israéliens sont préoccupés par les statistiques qui concernent non seulement les tendances démographiques à l’intérieur des frontières de l’État d’Israël, mais aussi dans les 28 000 kilomètres carrés séparant la Méditerranée du Jourdain ou en d’autres termes, la Palestine du Mandat britannique. « Si nous ajoutons la population de Gaza et la Cisjordanie au million et demi d’Arabes qui vivent en Israël, et le comparons au nombre de juifs israéliens, la différence est minime. Mais si l’on tient compte de la rapidité avec laquelle la population arabe augmente, ils seront bientôt plus nombreux », ajoute Della Pergola.

Ce sont ces chiffres qui ont mis en alarme toute la classe politique, à gauche comme à droite, et qui a conduit beaucoup d’entre eux, y compris Olmert, à imaginer la création d’un Etat palestinien non pas comme un cadeau, mais pour la survie du projet sioniste. En effet Olmert affirme que le jour où le nombre des Arabes sera supérieur à celui des juifs, l’existence même d’Israël sera en danger. « Si arrive le jour où la solution des deux États [un israélien et un palestinien] échoue, et que nous sommes obligés de faire face à une lutte pour l’égalité des droits dans le style de l’Afrique du Sud, ce jour-là l’État d’Israël sera mort », a déclaré Olmert à Washington après la conférence d’Annapolis qui devait déboucher sur la création d’un État palestinien. Yossi Beilin, du parti de gauche Meretz, partage cette vision avec Olmert. « Une minorité de Juifs qui domine une majorité palestinienne, ce serait comme l’ex-régime sud-africain. Le monde ne le tolérerait pas. »

Les candidats à la succession d’Olmert analysent aussi le conflit au Moyen-Orient à travers le prisme démographique, mais ils proposent des solutions très différentes.

« Pour les trois [Tzipi Livni, Netanyahu et Shaul Mofaz] c’est une question cruciale », a déclaré Arnon Soffer, le prophète de « la menace démographique arabe », Professeur en géostratégie à l’Université de Haïfa. Les trois hommes politiques ont défilé dans ses cours et se sont laissés imprégner par ses prédictions, indique Soffer.

Nétanyahou à la tête du Likoud d’extrême-droite et en tête selon certains sondages, l’a sollicité à nouveau pour le consulter sur la question, selon le professeur. Pour Netanyahou, contrairement à Olmert ou Livni, la préoccupation démographique ne l’amène pas à défendre la nécessité de la création d’un Etat palestinien dans les plus brefs délais. Au contraire, des sources proches du candidat ultra-conservateur ont expliqué que « bien que les données démographiques soient une question critique, il pense qu’il est impossible de parvenir à un accord avec les Palestiniens dans les circonstances actuelles, avec le Hamas au pouvoir à Gaza. » Mais on soupçonne des mesures visant à empêcher les Arabes israéliens de diluer la nature juive de leur pays.

Mais si une grande partie de la classe politique israélienne est si pressée de voir aboutir un accord conduisant à la création d’un Etat palestinien, ou au moins de fixer quelques frontières définitives, pourquoi les faits sur le terrain, comme l’expansion des colonies, vont-ils dans le sens opposé ? Parce que comme l’explique Calev Ben-Dor, un analyste de Reut, un groupe de réflexion de Tel-Aviv, « une chose est de vouloir un Etat palestinien et une autre est qu’il y ait un consensus sur ce que les frontières doivent être, de ce qu’il faut faire de Jérusalem ou avec les réfugiés. » Et conclut Beilin : « Tout le monde sait que le statu quo n’est pas viable et que nous devons aller vers le partage, la question est de savoir si nous avons des dirigeants disposés à le faire. »

La chasse à l’émigrant

L’Agence Juive est chargée de recruter les Juifs dans le monde et de les amener en Israël. Ils viennent pour réaliser leur rêve religieux, sioniste ou tout simplement pour améliorer leur situation financière. La loi du retour leur permet d’émigrer en raison de l’histoire familiale juive, et d’obtenir un certain nombre d’avantages, parmi eux la citoyenneté, les cours d’hébreu gratuits, un logement temporaire ou 15 000 US dollars (9700 euros) dans le soi-disant « panier d’intégration ».

Par le passé, le projet a très bien réussi pour trois millions de juifs qui ont fini par s’installer en Israël. Le problème se pose aujourd’hui, la plupart des Juifs dans le monde vivant dans des pays où ils ne se sentent pas menacés et où ils bénéficient d’un bon niveau de vie.

La solution était un moment en Russie. L’ex-Union soviétique a été la plus grande réserve de juifs dans le monde. En 1990, avec l’effondrement politique les portes se sont ouvertes et, depuis lors, un million de soviétiques se sont installés en Israël. Mais chaque année, il y a un millier de russes en moins que l’année précédente. "Le niveau de vie en Russie s’est beaucoup amélioré et c’est la raison pour laquelle les juifs du pays ont moins d’intérêt à venir, » explique Michael Jankelowitz, porte-parole de l’Agence Juive.

#ff0066; font-family: "Helvetica","sans-serif"; mso-ansi-language: FR" xml:lang="FR">Par conséquent, ils ont décidé de se tourner vers les États-Unis, pays qui a la plus grande communauté juive dans le monde et qui bénéficie d’un bon niveau de vie, et où il y a de nombreux candidats à l’émigration pour des motifs religieux.#ff0066; font-family: "Helvetica","sans-serif"; mso-ansi-language: FR" xml:lang="FR"> Pour séduire les juifs américains afin de compenser la baisse d’entrée des russes, l’Agence Juive a lancé des campagnes par voie terrestre, maritime et aérienne.

L’un de ses programmes invite chaque année 10 000 enfants américains à passer un semestre dans une université israélienne avec l’idée que certains d’entre eux finiront par s’y installer de manière permanente. Ils envoient également en camps d’été 1500 jeunes appelés « émissaires » de l’autre côté de l’Atlantique pour que « depuis une perspective sioniste ils expliquent le rôle que joue Israël dans leur vie », dit Jankelowitz.

Sur le même thème :

  La démographie palestinienne vaincra
  Les changements démographiques entre la mer et le fleuve
  L’État d’Israël va-t-il bientôt disparaître ?
  Israël manque de candidats à l’immigration
  4,26 millions de réfugiés palestiniens dans le monde

Cherifa Sirry

Long time no see!  Indeed you are right about the author.  We all have the same info... but what does each party want to do with it?  The clever Israelis like the butcher Sharon or even the idiot Olmert are now pleading for a Palestinian state and even considering a one state solution.  But it's too late.  Israelis and Jews let matters get too out of hand... and I think that they know that they have lost the battle.  This is why they so desperately need a war... and it must involve the US.  Israelis have built a community of Evangelicals and a Zionist lobby that is too Israeli for Israel's good.  This community is now burying Israel with 'love'.  In my opinion, Israel is doomed to failure.  The question is however, who will Israel succeed in dragging into its dark hole?

We are definitely in for a show.  Actually the show has already started in the Middle East and things a very heated with threats flying right and left... but hardly anything is covered in Western media...

So far, Israeli performance has been disastrous... but I am sure that Israel will not sink quietly.

Cherifa Sirry

That israel is allowed to stand... What would the implications of this have in the real world?

Palestine IS Free.

Palestine IS the COUNTRY.

Palestine IS FREE

Sorry israel. Now GET OUT.

Palestine IS FREE

Palestine will erase the invasion.

Palestine is free.

Palestine was never Isarel.

Don't become erased waving an israeli flag now.

First you take D.C. Then you take New York (:

First you take D.C. Then you take New York :)

again will a homeland for the jews be sought. As a consequence of this failure they will be dispersed and dispirited realising that their religion is as much a human institution as any of the religions they despised, and will marry out into the surrounding populations.

 The culmination of many hundreds of years of fervent aspiration for a Jewish homeland based on spirituality and leadership by high example has instead been characterised by slow genocide of neighbours by turns.

It is this lingering shame of decades of calculated murder of a dispossessed people, and the fabricated Holocaust to make the ignoble enterprise possible in the first place, which will turn jews away from their religion.

Azure

the Jewish state will not even exist in the next two-to-three decades

Two-to-three decades?

#ff0000">I give it less then 7 years......

copy and save my words.

7 Years?!  mmmmm....  Men bo2ak le bab el sama!!!  This has to be the lowest estimate I've heard.  I had in mind about 2 decades or even a little more until it is literally removed from the map.

Do you mean 7 years for Israel's fall and failure to be an absolute accepted fact... but it will still drag around because we know that the Jews will spend years whining... or do you mean 7 years before it is totally eradicated and off the map including the whining an all?

Cherifa Sirry

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